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These resources were developed for Spring 2020 emergency remote instruction. To view the updated strategies and resources for remote teaching in Fall 2020, please visit the newly redesigned Keep Teaching website.

Remote Assessments


Just as in a face-to-face environment, instructors in a remote course should craft assessments that not only allow students to demonstrate their acquired knowledge, skills, and attitudes, but also to inform future instruction and improve student success and retention. Assessments can be formative or summative in nature, graded or ungraded, but they should always be meaningful and tied to the learning objectives.

Remote exams can be administered in various formats:

Take-Home Exam or Assignment

A take-home exam or assignment can be completed outside of the classroom at the student’s pace, then submitted online via Canvas or other integrated tool such as Gradescope.

Create an Assignment in Canvas

Online Exam

An online exam is a set of questions in a quiz format delivered through Canvas. The question type for online exams range from multiple choice to short answer. Online exams are typically timed and recommended for proctoring.

Create a Canvas Quiz

Project-Based Assignment

Projects can range from group work, portfolios, presentations, reports, creative work, that are completed outside of class and can be submitted in a file format via Canvas.

Create an Assignment in Canvas

 

Strategies for Remote Assessments and When to Proctor

Selecting the Appropriate Assessment

Remote assessments can be handled in various formats and designed according to the learning objectives you are assessing. Not all assessments need to be graded or have a point-value; however all assessments should be meaningful and contribute to the desired learning objective.

  1. Identify the learning objective and the Blooms' order of thinking to be demonstrated in the assessment.

  2. Determine the criteria and characteristics for which you will review or evaluate achievement.

  3. Design the assessment that will best demonstrate the desired outcome.

     

1. Learning Objective 2. Characteristics 3. Assessment Types
CREATE Put elements together to form a coherent or functional whole, a new pattern, or structure canvas assignmentResearch Study, Composition, Performance, Essay, Business/Organization Plan, Web or Product Design, Proposition or hypothesis, Find a solution, Portfolio

EVALUATE Make constructive judgements based on criteria and standards

canvas assignmentCritique, Product Review, Research Paper, Peer Review, Self Assessment

canvas quizProblem sets

ANALYZE Break into parts and determine how parts relate or contribute to a structure or purpose

canvas assignmentCase Studies, Labs, Reports, Essays, Projects,  Argumentation, Evidence

canvas discussionDebates, Argumentation, Perspective

APPLY Carry out or use a procedure in a given situation canvas assignmentDemonstrate a process, Complete a new task, Prototype, Simulation, Reflection, Presentation, Problem Sets
UNDERSTAND Construct meaning from instructional messages and content

canvas discussionShort Answer, Compare-and-Contrast, Identify examples or principles

canvas quizTrue/False, Multiple Choice, Problem Sets, Categorize

canvas assignmentReading Summary, Paraphrase, Short Essay

REMEMBER Retrieve information such as terms, facts, and concepts from memory

canvas quizMultiple choice, Matching, Fill-in-the-blank, True/False, Self-Check, Label, Identify terminology and facts


Key Tool

Canvas Quiz

Canvas Quiz
Discussion Canvas Discussion
Canvas Assignment Canvas Assignment

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

Create a Quiz in Canvas

The Canvas Quiz tool allows you to create a test or a quiz that consist of various question types including Multiple Choice, True/False, Matching, Fill-in-the-Blank, Numerical, Short Answer/Essay, and more.

See the Canvas Quiz Guides.

1. Write Questions

2. Add to Canvas

3. Publish the Quiz

4. Review & Score

Prepare questions (and multiple versions) to incorporate in the online exam. 

Determine dates: 

  • Due Date
  • Submission Window
  • Available From
  • Available Until

Create a Canvas Quiz


Add questions

Configure settings

Publish the quiz, configure score release, then let students know they can submit the final online.

Tip: You can use the “View as a student” from the Canvas homepage to access a preview of the online exam and test the submission process. 

When you are ready to score the submissions, open SpeedGrader or student results  to review materials, provide feedback, and enter a score. 

Accessibility reminders:

Create accessible exam instructions, to ensure all students can understand the information:

  • Images: Provide alternate text for images or scanned graphs
  • Captions: Ensure all videos have captions
  • Colors: Do not use color alone to convey meaning, and select colors with high contrast ratios

Accommodations:

Give individual students extra time, if appropriate based on accommodation letter from the Office of Students with Disabilities.

  1. In Course Navigation, click the Quizzes link.
  2. Click the name of the quiz.
  3. Click the Moderate This Quiz link.
  4. Locate the student and click the Edit icon.
  5. Type the number of extra minutes in the Extra Time on Every Attempt field.

Create a Discussion in Canvas

The Canvas Discussion tool is an open message board in which students write a response and expect to see other students' responses.

See Strategies for facilitating Threaded Discussion Forums.

 

1. Prompt

2. Add to Canvas

3. Collect Responses

4. Review & Score

Prepare instructions or a writing prompt

Determine key dates: 

  • Due Date
  • Submission Window

Create a Canvas Discussion

Enter the discussion prompt using the Rich Text Editor

Configure the options

  • Allow threaded replies: let students respond to the posts of other students
  • Graded: Click to configure the points and assignment details

Publish the discussion, configure score release, then let students know they can participate in the conversation online. 

Tip: You can use the “View as a student” from the Canvas homepage to access a preview of the discussion. To make sure the discussion is presented at the top of the discussion page, consider “pinning” the discussion.

Be sure to be present in the discussion by reading student responses, and replying as appropriate. 

When you are ready to score the submissions, open SpeedGrader to review materials, provide feedback, and enter a score

Accessibility reminders:

Create accessible discussion instructions, to ensure all students can understand the information:

  • Images: Provide alternate text for images or scanned graphs
  • Captions: Ensure all videos have captions
  • Colors: Do not use color alone to convey meaning, and select colors with high contrast ratios

Create an Assignment (with Turnitin) in Canvas

Assignments in Canvas allow instructors to collect files, documents, media, and other forms of student-produced work.

See Strategies for Assignments.

 

1. Write Assignment Prompt

2. Add to Canvas

3. Collect Submissions

4. Review & Score

Prepare instructions or a writing prompt

Include an academic integrity pledge

Determine key dates: 

  • Due Date
  • Submission Window:
  • Available From: first day and time
  • Available Until: last day and time

Create a Canvas Assignment

Upload instructions using the Rich Text Editor

Select Online Submission and indicate type

[Optional] Configure Turnitin plagiarism review

Configure key dates

Publish the assignment, configure score release, then let students know they can submit the assignment online. 


Tip: You can use the “View as a student” from the Canvas homepage to access a preview of the online exam and test the submission process. 

When you are ready to score the submissions, open SpeedGrader to review materials, provide feedback, and enter a score

Accessibility reminders:

Create accessible assignment instructions, to ensure all students can understand the information:

  • Images: Provide alternate text for images or scanned graphs
  • Captions: Ensure all videos have captions
  • Colors: Do not use color alone to convey meaning, and select colors with high contrast ratios

Assessments that Promote Integrity

A well-designed assessment may not need proctoring:

The strongest way to prevent academic integrity violations is a well-designed assessment. Proctoring cannot prevent students from making bad decisions under stress and pressured environments. Proctors also do not ask students to think critically, reflect on their learning, and demonstrate their skills to the best of their ability. A well-designed assessment will probe students to use their acquired knowledge, apply their understanding, and use their analytical skills to find a solution.

Characteristics of a well-designed assessment: 

  • Perspective: Assignments that require students to read, interpret, and respond to scenarios, a unique problem set, or provide a different perspective

  • Random Question Pool: Randomized sets of questions, so that information sharing is insufficient to document every possible combination of questions

  • Scaffolded: Assignments that build on existing work and demonstrate improvement over time

  • Choice: Questions that allow students to choose between several options

  • Authentic: Questions that allow students to reflect on their process, a personal challenge, or an interest in a specific topic

  • Creative: Assignments that allow students to express themselves using video, a teaching method, original artwork, oral presentation

  • Integrity Reminders: A requirement to sign academic integrity pledges, which remind students of the implications of cheating

  • Timed: Either in the form of a strict time limit (e.g. Quizzes) or tight submission windows (e.g. Quizzes or Assignments)

Students are less likely to cheat if the assessment has meaning, that is, it is individualized, interesting, unique, current, and engaging; it is not easily copied from a solutions manual or from the Internet. - Academic Integrity Office


Accommodations for Students with Disabilities

Accommodations for students with disabilities must be provided for final exams. Instructors should receive an Authorization for Accommodation (AFA) letter via email for any student requiring accommodations.

Additional information may be found on the Office for Students with Disabilities (OSD) website.

When to Proctor

When Proctoring is a strong option: 

  • The exam is multiple choice or short-answer in an online format

  • The assessment is timed and password-protected

  • The exam window can remain open for 48 hours or more (wider for larger class sizes)

  • The course has a history of academic misconduct that needs to be mitigated

  • Proctoring has been identified as a need early in the term, and implemented in the course at least three to four weeks prior to the assessment

Learn about Proctoring Services supported by the campus.


Alternative options: 

If you determine that proctoring is not the appropriate solution, but you want to incorporate additional safeguards against cheating, consider the following tools: 

  • Turnitin: Run written work through Turnitin.com, to check for plagiarism and appropriate citation

  • Respondus: Incorporate Respondus Lock-Down Browser, which prevents students from opening other browser windows or tools on the computer on which they are taking the assessment.

Note: Always be prepared to provide students with alternate mechanisms to submit final assessments, whether proctoring or not. Be mindful of the requirements of final assessments and design your assessments so that they provide students options for alternate means of expression. Please contact the Digital Learning Hub for additional help with implementing alternative mechanisms. 

Recorded Webinar

Wednesday, April 8

10am - 11am 

 

Remote Assessments and Proctoring:

Well-Designed Assessments and When to Proctor

Watch the Recording | Download the Slides

 


Additional Resources: